Jews

Jerusalem in Photos from 1862: No mosques, no Palestinians – only ghost towns of massacred Christian areas


A new photographic exhibition in London follows the journey taken by England’s Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) in 1862, as he undertook a four month tour around the Middle East.

And as usual, no sign of mosques or active Palestinian presence as the decades old argument from the Palestinian side to keep up the saga to fight and occupy, for the sake of jihad and foreign aid.

In the exhibition we find more photographs from Jerusalem in 1862, when the so called “palestinians” allegedly were already 1 million in population on land they profess to have “lost to Jewish occupation” a few decades later. The only problem with this argument is that, as with all photographs up to the second decade of 1900’s, there are rarely any Muslims or mosques to be found on any photographs. The only mosque – and a confiscated synagogue converted after Muslim invasion is the Temple Mount’s Dome of the Rock – and it stands empty of Muslims in ALL pictures through the 1800’s and early 1900’s, demonstrating the falsity in the Palestinian argument. There are more evidence and remains of the massacres Muslims caused on Christians, than any living signs of Muslims themselves. In comparison, other towns with a living Muslim population documented in photographs during the mid and late 1800’s always feature a lot of mosques.

.
.

Cairo to Constantinople: Early Photographs of the Middle East

The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

Friday, 7 November 2014 to Sunday, 22 February 2015

This exhibition follows the journey taken by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) in 1862, as he undertook a four month tour around the Middle East.

Seen through the photographs of Francis Bedford (1815-94), the first photographer to travel on a royal tour, it explores the cultural and political significance Victorian Britain attached to the region, which was then as complex and contested as it remains today.

The tour took the Prince to Egypt, Palestine and the Holy Land, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece where he met rulers, politicians and other notable figures, and travelled in a manner not associated with royalty – by horse and camping out in tents.

On the royal party’s return to England, Francis Bedford’s work was displayed in what was described as ‘the most important photographic exhibition that has hitherto been placed before the public’.

Cairo to Constantinople: Early Photographs of the Middle East is presented alongside Gold at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace.

The Mount of Olives and Garden of Gethsemane

The Mount of Olives and Garden of Gethsemane [Jerusalem]

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date: 2 Apr 1862
Materials: Albumen print, mounted on card
Dimensions: 23.4 x 28.5 cm
RCIN 2700922
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance: Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

The Mount of Olives rises to the east of Jerusalem. The walled enclosure to the right contains the site identified as the Garden of Gethsemane. After the Last Supper, Jesus went to the garden where he prayed, accompanied by St Peter, St John and St James the Greater. Jesus was subsequently betrayed by Judas in the garden and arrested.

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated (incorrectly as 2 March 1862) in the negative, ‘F Bedford Jerusalem’. The number in the Day & Son series is 63.

Hasbeiya - scene of the massacre [Syria]

Hasbeiya – scene of the massacre [Hasbaya, Lebanon]

 

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  26 Apr 1862
Materials:  Albumen print
Dimensions:  23.2 x 29.0 cm
RCIN  2700954
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance: Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

On their route towards Damascus, the royal party stopped at some of the towns and villages close to the Lebanon-Syria border, which had seen fighting during the 1860 conflict. The first town they reached was Hasbaya. The Prince was told that between 800 and 1000 Christians were killed here by the Druze [Muslim Shia minority group].

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated in the negative, ‘F Bedford Hasbeiya’. The number in the Day & Son series is 90.

Garden of Gethsemane

Garden of Gethsemane [Jerusalem]

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  2 Apr 1862
Materials:  Albumen print, mounted on card
Dimensions:  21.1 x 29.1 cm
RCIN  2700924
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance:  Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

The Garden of Gethsemane has always been identified as an olive grove. Here the carefully tended, centuries-old olive trees are easily identified.

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated (incorrectly as 2 March 1862) in the negative, ‘F Bedford Gethsemane’. The number in the Day & Son series is 68.

 

Rasheiya [Syria]

Rasheiya [Rashaya, Lebanon]

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  27 Apr 1862
Materials:  Albumen print
Dimensions:  23.6 x 29.0 cm
RCIN  2700955
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance:
Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

Rashaya, a mostly Druze-inhabited town [Shia Muslim sect], was the scene of conflict in June 1860. The Prince wrote: ‘In this town, 400 to 500 Christians were massacred and we saw still the remains of the burnt houses.’ In July, the conflict spread from this area into Damascus.

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated in the negative, ‘F Bedford Rasheiya’. The number in the Day & Son series is 92.

 

Gateway to the Citadel, Banias, Golan

Gateway to the “Metzuda” Citadel, Banias, Golan

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  23 Apr 1862
Materials:  Albumen print
Dimensions:  23.6 x 28.0 cm
RCIN  2700951
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance:  Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

View of dilapidated entrance to Citadel – part of complex of Castle of Banyas. Stream runs through ditch in foreground.

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated in the negative, ‘F Bedford Banias’. The number in the Day & Son series is 87.

 

Upper Bethoron

Upper Bethoron [Beit Ur al-Foqa and the Valley of Ajalon]

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  31 Mar 1862
Materials:  Albumen print, mounted on card
Dimensions:  23.1 x 29.0 cm
RCIN  2700913
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance:  Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

The Royal Yacht reached Jaffa (modern-day Tel Aviv) on 29 March. The following day the royal party set out on horses in the direction of Jerusalem. En route they visited Beit Ur al-Foqa from where they could view the Valley of Ajalon, the site of a famous biblical battle, fought by Joshua, the leader of the Israelites, against the Amorite kings.

The photograph is signed, captioned and dated in the negative, ‘F Bedford Bethoron’. The number in the Day & Son series is 50.

 

Jerusalem from Mount of Olives

Jerusalem, From Mount of Olives

Creator: Francis Bedford (1815-94) (photographer)
Creation Date:  Mar-Apr 1862
Materials:  Albumen print, mounted on card
Dimensions:  22.7 x 29.1 cm
RCIN  2700915
Acquirer: King Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910), when Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (1841-63)
Provenance:  Acquired by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), 1862

Description:

View from slopes and olive groves of the Mount of Olives towards distant rooftops of Jerusalem.
The royal party arrived at Jerusalem in the evening of 31 March. They set up a camp outside the city walls, between the Damascus Gate and the Gate of St. Stephen. Their first evening was spent walking along the walls of the town, taking in the view of the city, under the guidance of the Revd Dr Stanley, one of the gentlemen in the Prince’s party.

The photograph is unsigned, uncaptioned and undated. The number in the Day & Son series is 52.

 

 

121 thoughts on “Jerusalem in Photos from 1862: No mosques, no Palestinians – only ghost towns of massacred Christian areas

  1. Pingback: The Promised Land – “He shall be called a Nazarene.” Matthew 2:23

  2. Pingback: There's Something About Jerusalem - Zeteo 3:16

  3. Israel Information Center Ithaca
    Thus there is a need to initiate a search for family published travel journals reporting on their travels within the Middle East. Many upper class Europeans this was the social media —- as likewise bloggers — of their time and era of the nineteen century into early century which followed. Such journals may still be the shelves of their family libraries or the geographic societies they were members and/or contributors.

  4. Can you provide properly researched evidence proving the Arabs had a significant presence in Palestine in the 1860`s? Eywitnesses like Mark Twain certainly did not.

    Mark Twain’s report from Palestine in 1867 showing how uninhabited the barren land was, plus the absolute poverty of the few people that did live there.

    “Of all the lands there are for dismal scenery, I think Palestine must be the prince. The hills are barren, they are dull of color, they are unpicturesque in shape. The valleys are unsightly deserts fringed with a feeble vegetation that has an expression about it of being sorrowful and despondent. The Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee sleep in the midst of a vast stretch of hill and plain wherein the eye rests upon no pleasant tint, no striking object, no soft picture dreaming in a purple haze or mottled with the shadows of the clouds. Every outline is harsh, every feature is distinct, there is no perspective — distance works no enchantment here. It is a hopeless, dreary, heart-broken land.

    Small shreds and patches of it must be very beautiful in the full flush of spring, however, and all the more beautiful by contrast with the far-reaching desolation that surrounds them on every side. I would like much to see the fringes of the Jordan in spring-time, and Shechem, Esdraelon, Ajalon and the borders of Galilee — but even then these spots would seem mere toy gardens set at wide intervals in the waste of a limitless desolation.

    Palestine sits in sackcloth and ashes. Over it broods the spell of a curse that has withered its fields and fettered its energies. Where Sodom and Gomorrah reared their domes and towers, that solemn sea now floods the plain, in whose bitter waters no living thing exists — over whose waveless surface the blistering air hangs motionless and dead — about whose borders nothing grows but weeds, and scattering tufts of cane, and that treacherous fruit that promises refreshment to parching lips, but turns to ashes at the touch. Nazareth is forlorn; about that ford of Jordan where the hosts of Israel entered the Promised Land with songs of rejoicing, one finds only a squalid camp of fantastic Bedouins of the desert; Jericho the accursed, lies a moldering ruin, to-day, even as Joshua’s miracle left it more than three thousand years ago; Bethlehem and Bethany, in their poverty and their humiliation, have nothing about them now to remind one that they once knew the high honor of the Saviour’s presence; the hallowed spot where the shepherds watched their flocks by night, and where the angels sang Peace on earth, good will to men, is untenanted by any living creature, and unblessed by any feature that is pleasant to the eye. Renowned Jerusalem itself, the stateliest name in history, has lost all its ancient grandeur, and is become a pauper village; the riches of Solomon are no longer there to compel the admiration of visiting Oriental queens; the wonderful temple which was the pride and the glory of Israel, is gone, and the Ottoman crescent is lifted above the spot where, on that most memorable day in the annals of the world, they reared the Holy Cross. The noted Sea of Galilee, where Roman fleets once rode at anchor and the disciples of the Saviour sailed in their ships, was long ago deserted by the devotees of war and commerce, and its borders are a silent wilderness; Capernaum is a shapeless ruin; Magdala is the home of beggared Arabs; Bethsaida and Chorazin have vanished from the earth, and the “desert places” round about them where thousands of men once listened to the Saviour’s voice and ate the miraculous bread, sleep in the hush of a solitude that is inhabited only by birds of prey and skulking foxes.

    Palestine is desolate and unlovely. And why should it be otherwise? Can the curse of the Deity beautify a land?

    Palestine is no more of this work-day world. It is sacred to poetry and tradition — it is dream-land.”

    https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/t/twain/mark/innocents/chapter56.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s